Égalité For All

Égalité For All

In the initial weeks after the earthquake of January, 2010, journalists offered some historical context in their accounts of Haiti’s present situation.  Haiti’s place in the Western Hemisphere has not always been “the poorest country” as is so often repeated. Haiti, once known as Saint Domingue, was the site of a successful slave uprising that would shape the maps of several countries.  The Haitian Revolution should be taught alongside the American struggle for independence and the French Revolution, but is often neglected.  In an effort to highlight this important history we would like to point out Égalité For All:  Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution.

 

Elections in Haiti

Last Monday, February 7th, marked the 25th anniversary of the departure of Jean Claude Duvalier, sometimes referred to as “Baby Doc.”  Duvalier unexpectedly returned to Haiti last month amidst debates over Haiti’s political future.  For anyone following news of Haiti, the past year’s earthquake, cholera outbreak, hurricane, and political developments could be overwhelming.  We recently asked our supporters what kind of content they would like to see in our newsletters.  This article addresses one recommendation and attempts to bring clarity to Haiti’s complex political situation as it has evolved over the past six months.

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Nan Plim

OBJECTIVE: Capture and treat a large water source

WHERE: Nan Plim
COMMITTEE:
APDAG
PROJECTED COST:
$32,000
BENEFICIARIES:
1,200 residents.

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A New Mandate for Development in Haiti

By Chad Bissonnette, as seen in the Huffington Post:

Wasted resources are easy to come by in Haiti, where a volatile and overwhelmed government presides, and a multitude of NGOs (non-governmental organizations) incoherently work to address the needs not being fulfilled by the government. The amount of waste is evident in the fact that very little has changed since the earthquake. A Haitian colleague and I noted that photographs taken today of public spaces (the homes of hundreds of tent communities) in Port-au-Prince would be almost identical to photographs taken of the same spaces a year earlier (just a couple of weeks after the earthquake). Not only has this generally ineffective response had a negative impact on the hopes of the Haitian people, but it has also caused serious frustrations in American citizens that donated hard-earned money to disaster relief and reconstruction immediately after the earthquake.

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